World War I Soldiers Remembered: Frank Malvin Henley

11 May

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Frank Malvin Henley was born March 26, 1892 in Goochland, Virginia. His parents were Archer and Cora Henley. Frank’s job before the war was as a telephone line repairman with C&P Telephone Company. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had gray eyes and light hair.

He was inducted into service on May 16, 1918, assigned to the engineer section of the U.S. Army in Co. D, 29th Regiment. He left New York on July 8, 1918 on board the S.S. Toloa and arrived at Brest France on July 21, 1918.

Henley arrived back in the United States aboard the Princess Matoika on April 27, 1919. We know very little about his service in World War I because like many of the soldiers, he did not fill out his Military Service Record completely.

After the war, Henley took up residence on Hanover Avenue in Richmond and worked as an electrician in the city. Sadly, while Henley survived the battles of World War I, the war would follow him home and take his life here. While in France, Henley apparently contracted tuberculosis. The disease would end his life at the age of 32 on October 27, 1924.  He is buried in the Dover Baptist Church cemetery.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

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World War I Soldiers Remembered: Arthur Bryan Henley

4 May

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Arthur Bryan Henley was born August 26, 1897 in Goochland, Virginia. Arthur’s father was Erastus Henley and his mother was Mary Lou Alvis. Arthur was a 21 year old farmer living with his parents in the Sabot area of Goochland. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single and had grey eyes and dark hair.

He was inducted into service on September 5, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to the 97th Provisional Company. In the margin of his Military Service Record, Arthur wrote that his “outfit were replacement troops, no division.” He left Norfolk, Virginia on October 27, 1918. Arthur boarded the USS Koningin der Nederlander, a Danish ship that had been seized by the U.S. Government for service after entry into World War I. He arrived at Brest France on November 9, 1918. Shortly after he arrived in France, he was transferred to Pont Leroy, France.

Henley arrived back at Newport News aboard the U.S.S. George on February 23, 1919 and was officially discharged on March 8 of the same year. About his service, he wrote “I believe it has been a great help to me both mentally and physically.”

Arthur Bryan Henley House

Arthur Bryan Henley’s home, still standing as of 2018.

Arthur returned to Goochland where in 1927 he married Mabel Gathright. He remained a farmer for the remainder of his life. He passed away on March 27, 1977 at the age of 80 is buried in the Goochland Baptist Church cemetery.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Leroy Daniel Ford

27 Apr

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Leroy Daniel Ford was born May 21, 1896 in Goochland. His parents were Lee Ford and Minnie Keeton. Leroy was a 21 year old machine operator living in Richmond when he was drafted on June 28, 1917. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall, of medium build and had gray eyes and dark brown hair.

He was inducted into service on June 28, 1917 and sent to Fort Monroe, Virginia, assigned to the Coast Artillery. The following was written by Leroy Ford and is in the records of the society.

“I enlisted in the coast artillery in June 1917. Was sent to Fortress Monroe for training. They called for volunteers there for over sea service and 9 volunteered and was sent to Camp Mills, New York, and left there for France Aug. 18, 1917. We sailed on the Covington. It took us 13 days to cross over. We were shot at once by torpedoes but not hit. We landed at St. Nazare (Saint-Nazaire), and stayed there 7 days. From there went to Moeire (sic), was there two weeks, from there went to Savoy. Was on guard duty there. Went from Savoy to Aucavoir (sic). I spent my first Christmas over seas there. We were hiking here, snow up to our knees, from 7 am to 9 pm. Would cover from 18 to 20 miles. From Aucavoir (sic) to Rollin Point. Stayed here 35 days. We went to school here to learn traffic duty. Went from Rollin Point to Luneiville (Lunéville) Sector 22nd Feb. 18 to 24 March 1918. Baccarat, 24th Mar. St. Clement Sector 24th Mar. to June 15th 1918. We held the trenches here Champagne-Marne Defensive 15th July to 18 July 1918. Aisne-Marne Offensive 18th July to 6th August 1918. St-Mihiel Offensive 12th and 13th Sept. 1918. Minor operations were 14th Sept. to 25th Sept. 1918. Operations between Meuse and Moselle (Meuse Argonne Offensive) 26th Sept. to Nov. 11 1918. Army of occupation 27th Nov. 1918 to April 1919. Was discharged from service at Camp Meade May 6 1919. Leroy D. Ford”

Ford arrived back at Hoboken on April 2, 1919 and was officially discharged on May 6 of the same year. Leroy returned to work in Richmond and married Lelah S. in October of 1919. They remained married until her death in 1991. Leroy passed away on May 2, 1995, at 99 years of age. He is buried in the Forest Lawn Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

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Leroy Ford after the war.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Claude Raymond Faudree

20 Apr

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Claude Raymond Faudree was born December 12, 1894 in Johnson Springs, Virginia. Claude’s father was William Rice Faudree and his mother was Zelmira Pendleton Childress. Claude was a 22 year old farmer when he was drafted on September 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee.

He was inducted into service on September 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to Co. C, 317 infantry, 80th Division. He was a private and became the company cook. He left Newport News, Virginia on May 26, 1918 onboard the USS Mongolia. He arrived at Brest France on June 8, 1918. Shortly after he arrived in France, Claude proceeded to Calais and Somme. He participated in several battles: Somme offensive, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne, better known as the Battle of Argonne Forest, the largest battle in United States military history. He was awarded the Victory Service Ribbon and the Bronze Star.

After the war, Faudree traveled back to Newport News aboard the Nansemond on June 7, 1919 and was officially discharged on July 13 of the same year. About his service, he wrote “war is a very sad thing and to kill a man that loves his life as well as you…is a hard thing to do some times.”

Faudree returned to Johnson Springs and to farming. He married Geneva Corine Childress and fathered three children. He passed away on December 28, 1931 at the age of 37 from stomach cancer and is buried in the Goochland Baptist Church cemetery.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

George Inness in Goochland

18 Apr
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“Gray Day, Goochland” by George Inness, 1884

“There is no quarter of the globe so desirable as America, no state in America so desirable as Virginia.” Thomas Jefferson wrote these words in 1795 and by the spring of 1884, one of America’s most accomplished landscape painters, George Inness, left New York City bound for Virginia. Inness found his inspiration in Goochland.

For three months, Inness called Goochland his home while painting landscapes and enjoying the slower paced and incognito lifestyle. From Inness’ letters, it is clear that he stayed in the Courthouse area, possibly at the Old Inn which was situated adjacent to the jail, which he references in multiple letters.

During his stay in the Courthouse area, Innes explains in his letters home how pleased and happy he was with the progress being made on multiple paintings. Inness’ vast collection of paintings totals over 1,150 works, with four to six attributed to Goochland. “Gray Day, Goochland,” pictured here, is the most notable.

How Inness ended up in Goochland remains a mystery. He traveled to many parts of the country but his first trip to the South led him to Goochland. Inness suffered from epilepsy and was advised to seek out tranquil locations for relaxation. This or possibly his desire to remain unrecognized (as his popularity was at its peak) led Inness to end up in Goochland.

Inness’ trip to Goochland began the final ten years his life where his artwork took on a more abstract rendering of shapes, softened edges and saturated color.

Contributed by Ryan Dunn of the Goochland County Historical Society.

To learn more about George Inness in Goochland, read Goochland County Historical Society Magazine Vol. 20 “Why Not Goochland? George Inness in Goochland” by CeCe Bullard.  Available for purchase at the Historical Center and online.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Joseph Linwood Cosby

13 Apr

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Joseph Linwood Cosby was born May 1, 1897 in Goochland, Virginia. Joseph was a 21 year old farmer when he was drafted on September 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had brown eyes and brown hair. George’s father was William Cosby and his mother was Cora Hackett.

He was inducted into service on October 3, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to B Company, 13th Regiment. Joseph Cosby was one of the lucky ones. By entering service so late, he never saw Foreign Service

Cosby listed his occupation after the war as farmer and in 1919; he married Massie Shelton and moved to Richmond. He and Massie stayed married until 1947. He passed away on December 15, 1958 at the age of 61 and is buried in the Cosby family cemetery in Rockville, Virginia.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: George Walker Cosby

23 Mar
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George Walker Cosby entering service 1917

George Walker Cosby was born December 5, 1890 in Goochland, Virginia. George was a 27 year old saw mill operator when he was drafted on October 27, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, short and had brown eyes and dark hair. George’s father was William Cosby and his mother was Cora Hackett.

Cosby was inducted into service on November 1, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to 69th Company, 18th Training Battalion. He was later transferred to the 513 Engineers. He left Newport News, Virginia on April 29, 1918. He arrived at Bordeaux, France on May 13, 1918. By May 17, he was in Nantes, France.

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USS Mexican

After the war, Cosby arrived back in the United States at New York aboard the USS Mexican on June 8, 1919 and was officially discharged on July 8 of the same year. About his service, he wrote that he “was willing to do my duty” and though “not engaged in fighting” the effects upon him were “beneficial.”

Cosby listed his occupation after the war as farmer and he apparently stayed in the Goochland and Richmond area. He passed away on May 9, 1947 at the age of 56 and is buried in the Cosby family cemetery in Rockville, Virginia.

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Discharge photo 1919

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.