World War II Soldiers Remembered: James Harold Bowles

12 Jul
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June 12, 1921–January 17, 2019

James Harold Bowles graduated from Central High School in 1940 and attended Virginia Union University from 1940 to 1942. Bowles was 20-years-old and a student at VUU when he filled out his registration card in 1942. Soon after that he began work as a civil service employee in Pennsylvania and Hawaii from 1942 to 1944. While in Hawaii, he joined the United States Army and served two years. He resumed his studies and graduated from VUU in 1948 and from Meharry Medical School in 1952. After his internship, he returned home to Goochland County and opened his medical practice.

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World War II Soldiers Remembered: Henry Powers Shelton

5 Jul
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November 5, 1910–November 12, 1983

Henry Powers Shelton was born November 5, 1910 in Goochland, Virginia. He was 29-years-old when he registered in October of 1940. According to his Registration Card, we know he was 5 feet, 10 inches tall, and had gray eyes and brown hair. He listed the Bank of Goochland as his employer.

World War II Soldiers Remembered: Edward Holman Parrish, Jr.

28 Jun
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May 19, 1925–January 29, 2008

Edward “Eddie” Holman Parrish, Jr. was born May 19, 1925 in Goochland, Virginia. He was 18-years-old when he registered in May of 1943. According to his Registration Card, we know he was married, 6 feet, 2 inches tall, and had blue eyes, brown hair and was living in Columbia, Virginia. He worked on his father’s farm when not in school.

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World War II Soldiers Remembered: William Edward Fleming

19 Jun
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December 8, 1918–September 2, 2001

William Edward Fleming was born December 8, 1918 in Goochland, Virginia. He was 21-years-old when he registered for service in 1940. According to his registration card, he was the son of Lester Edward and Emma (Taylor) Fleming. He was 6 feet, 1 inch tall and had brown eyes and black hair. Fleming listed Westbrook Sanatorium as his employer. He married Josephine Elizabeth Robinson in 1943.

World War II Soldiers Remembered: Charles Massie Johnson

19 Jun
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March 17, 1916–July 31, 1986

Charles Massie Johnson was born March 17, 1916 in Goochland, Virginia. He was 24-years-old when he registered in October of 1940. According to his Registration Card, we know he was 5 feet, 11 inches tall, and had brown eyes and black hair. He listed his employer as the State Farm (James River Correctional Center) in Crozier. On March 3, 1945, he married Irene Davis Lacy in Richmond, Virginia.

World War II Soldiers Remembered: Robert Rollo Richmond

13 Jun
Robert Richmond

November 5, 1925 – February 21, 1945

Robert Rollo Richmond was born November 5, 1925 in Goochland, Virginia. He was 18-years-old when he registered in November of 1943. According to his Registration Card, we know he was 5 feet, 11 inches tall, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He listed the State Farm (James River Correctional Center) in Crozier as his employer.

He was assigned to the 484th Bombardment Group and was stationed at Torretto Airfield in Italy. While on a bombing mission over Austria, his plane was hit by flak and had to be abandoned. All crew members had to parachute out of the plane, before they did so, they attached a static line to the severely injured Sgt. Richmond and assisted him out of the plane first. He succumbed to his injuries and was buried in an unmarked grave near Novi Sad in present day Serbia.

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Standing L to R: Charles Marshall – Pilot, John Gross Jr. – Co-Pilot, Al Denealt – Navigator, and Robert F. Anderson – Bombardier. Kneeling L to R: Charles A. “Al” Harford – Engineer, George Joe Cataldo – Radio Operator, Robert D. “Bob” Powers – Upper Gunner, Pete Regelman – Nose Gunner, Bob Sorenson – Ball Gunner, and Robert Rollo Richmond – Tail Gunner.

Early photography

16 May

In the collection of the Goochland County Historical Society are several types of early photographic techniques. Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes all appeared in the mid 1800s. Daguerreotypes were first on the scene, beginning around 1839. They were made on a shiny, silver plated copper surface and had to be viewed from an angle for the best image. The surface is very delicate and they are usually sealed under glass.

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Daguerreotype of unknown child

Ambrotypes came along in the 1850s. It is an image made on a glass plate and is also quite delicate. They were usually sealed in a case and had a glass protective layer over the image. The prints were often tinted to add color.

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Ambrotype of unknown woman

Tintypes were the last on the scene and appeared in the 1850s buy enjoyed their peak of popularity in the 1860s and 1870s. The images were made on thin sheets of metal that were coated with a photographic emulsion. They were quite durable and didn’t need elaborate cases to protect them.

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Tintype of an unknown soldier

Since the tintype was so inexpensive and relatively easy to make, traveling photographers would load up their wagons and travel the countryside setting up their tents to bring photography to everyone.

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Photographers tent in front of George Bowles’ house, Shannon Hill

The photographs range from excellent to barely in focus. Sometimes the edges of the curtains or backgrounds could be viewed around the subjects. One wonders if they were given out at a reduced price?

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Sky and trees are clearly visible in the upper left corner as is the structure of the tent. 

All of the pictures shown on this page were donated to the society, unfortunately there are no names with them. One picture has “Mr. W. H. Bowles, Tabscott” scratched into the back of it, the only clue as to who the family might be. According to the 1870 census, there was a Walter H. Bowles living in Tabscott which hopefully puts the house and pictures in Goochland. Either way, the pictures are enjoyable and teach us a lesson about early techniques.

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Tintype, back of photograph has Mr W H Bowles, Tabscott scrated into the back.

*Update. The house with the photographers tent has been identified at the home of George Bowles, the father of Walter Bowles.