Tag Archives: World War I

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Claude Raymond Faudree

20 Apr
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Claude Raymond Faudree

Claude Raymond Faudree was born December 12, 1894 in Johnson Springs, Virginia. Claude’s father was William Rice Faudree and his mother was Zelmira Pendleton Childress. Claude was a 22 year old farmer when he was drafted on September 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee.

He was inducted into service on September 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to Co. C, 317 infantry, 80th Division. He was a private and became the company cook. He left Newport News, Virginia on May 26, 1918 onboard the USS Mongolia. He arrived at Brest France on June 8, 1918. Shortly after he arrived in France, Claude proceeded to Calais and Somme. He participated in several battles: Somme offensive, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne, better known as the Battle of Argonne Forest, the largest battle in United States military history. He was awarded the Victory Service Ribbon and the Bronze Star.

After the war, Faudree traveled back to Newport News aboard the Nansemond on June 7, 1919 and was officially discharged on July 13 of the same year. About his service, he wrote “war is a very sad thing and to kill a man that loves his life as well as you…is a hard thing to do some times.”

Faudree returned to Johnson Springs and to farming. He married Geneva Corine Childress and fathered three children. He passed away on December 28, 1931 at the age of 37 from stomach cancer and is buried in the Goochland Baptist Church cemetery.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

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World War I Soldiers Remembered: Joseph Linwood Cosby

13 Apr
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Joseph Linwood Cosby

Joseph Linwood Cosby was born May 1, 1897 in Goochland, Virginia. Joseph was a 21 year old farmer when he was drafted on September 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had brown eyes and brown hair. George’s father was William Cosby and his mother was Cora Hackett.

He was inducted into service on October 3, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to B Company, 13th Regiment. Joseph Cosby was one of the lucky ones. By entering service so late, he never saw Foreign Service

Cosby listed his occupation after the war as farmer and in 1919; he married Massie Shelton and moved to Richmond. He and Massie stayed married until 1947. He passed away on December 15, 1958 at the age of 61 and is buried in the Cosby family cemetery in Rockville, Virginia.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: George Walker Cosby

23 Mar
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George Walker Cosby entering service 1917

George Walker Cosby was born December 5, 1890 in Goochland, Virginia. George was a 27 year old saw mill operator when he was drafted on October 27, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, short and had brown eyes and dark hair. George’s father was William Cosby and his mother was Cora Hackett.

Cosby was inducted into service on November 1, 1917 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to 69th Company, 18th Training Battalion. He was later transferred to the 513 Engineers. He left Newport News, Virginia on April 29, 1918. He arrived at Bordeaux, France on May 13, 1918. By May 17, he was in Nantes, France.

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USS Mexican

After the war, Cosby arrived back in the United States at New York aboard the USS Mexican on June 8, 1919 and was officially discharged on July 8 of the same year. About his service, he wrote that he “was willing to do my duty” and though “not engaged in fighting” the effects upon him were “beneficial.”

Cosby listed his occupation after the war as farmer and he apparently stayed in the Goochland and Richmond area. He passed away on May 9, 1947 at the age of 56 and is buried in the Cosby family cemetery in Rockville, Virginia.

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Discharge photo 1919

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: William Earle Coffee

16 Mar
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William Earle Coffee

William Earle Coffee was born March 12, 1889 in Louisville, Kentucky. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, of medium build and had gray eyes and dark hair. Earle’s father was Dr. William Oakley Coffee and his mother was Mattie Merle Dodson. Shortly before the war, Earle’s mother purchased Eastwood, a large home in Sabot and relocated to Goochland.

On December 27, 1917, Earle boarded the British ship Andania in New York City and headed for the European theatre of war. After the war, he was aboard another British ship, Winifredian, when he returned from Brest, France on April 18, 1919.

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Eastwood

Earle returned briefly to Iowa and married before moving permanently to Goochland. The marriage didn’t last long and for a while Earle and his mother ran a tearoom near Eastwood, on River Road in Sabot. Eastwood burned in 1941 and he moved to Crozier and married Esther Mae Layne. That marriage lasted until his death on May 25, 1965, he was 76 years old. Earle Coffee is buried in Greenwood Memorial Gardens in Goochland.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: William Marion Childs

9 Mar
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William Marion Childs on left, unknown soldier on right.

William (Willie) Marion Childs was born July 31, 1888 in Fife, Virginia. He was a 28-year old Station Lineman with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad when he was drafted on May 27, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had gray eyes and brown hair. Willie’s father was William Wood Childs and his mother was Martha Catherine Tankersley, both born in Richmond, Virginia.

He was inducted into service on June 12, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to Co. A, Depot Brigade, 11th Battalion. He left Norfolk, Virginia for the European theatre on August 22, 1918. Willie boarded the USS Princess Matoika, a German ship that had been seized by the U.S. Government for service after entry into World War I. He arrived at Brest France on September 3, 1918. He proceeded from Brest to Contres then on to St. Aignan, Tours and Colombey-les-Belles, France. During his time in France, as a Corporal in the 68th Prisoner of War Escort Company, he worked as an electrician installing the wiring on a prisoner of war camp near the German border. He also was a patient in the worldwide influenza epidemic while stationed at Tours in October of 1918.

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USS Princess Matoika

Childs arrived back at Hoboken, New Jersey aboard the MSAT America on October 28, 1919 and was officially discharged from Camp Dix on November 1st of the same year. He reported that his experience in the war left him with “no bad effects” and about his state of mind afterwards, he wrote “I suppose my mind is as good as it was.”

Childs returned to Goochland and resumed his job as an electrician on the C & O railroad. He wired many of the houses around his home for electricity when it moved into the rural areas and at one time he operated a phone company in the same area. His body was discovered on Cartersville Road on February 2, 1946 and his death was attributed to heart disease. He was 57 years old. He is buried at Elk Hill Baptist Church.

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William Marion Childs, 1906

 

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Harry Briesmaster

1 Mar
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Harry Briesmaster ca. 1918

Harry Briesmaster was born October 31, 1892 in Brooklyn, New York. Harry was a 24 year old auto mechanic in Crozier when he was drafted on May 27, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had dark brown eyes and dark brown hair. Frederick’s father was Edward Briesmaster and his mother was Helen Wilke, both from Prussia.

According to his Military Service Record, he was inducted into service on June 12, 1918 and sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, assigned to Co. A, 11th Battalion, Depot Brigade. He transferred into Co. I, 12th Battalion, Infantry Training Center. He was promoted from Private to Corporal and then to Sergeant. He was discharged at Camp Lee on December 21, 1918

Harry returned to Goochland and resumed his profession as an auto mechanic. Along with his brothers, he was a part of Briesmaster Bros. which eventually became Briesmaster Chevrolet. He married Leita Ellis, his wartime sweetheart, in 1923. They remained married until her death in 1980. Harry passed away on January 31, 1986, at the age of 93 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.

World War I Soldiers Remembered: Edward Robert Briesmaster

23 Feb
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Edward Robert Briesmaster ca. 1918

Edward Robert Briesmaster was born December 7, 1888 in Brooklyn, New York. Edward grew up at a home called “Elmington” in what was then Enright, Virginia. Enright is now part of the Manakin-Sabot area of Goochland. He was working as a herdsman at a dairy in Lewiston, Idaho where he was drafted for World War I at the age of 29. According to his Registration Card, we know he was single, tall and had grey eyes and brown hair.

In July of 1918, he boarded the ship “Empress of Russia” bound for Europe and the war. Unfortunately, we don’t have much in the way of a service record for Edward because like a lot of the men and women, he did not fill out a questionnaire after the war.

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Edward Robert Briesmaster’s mess kit

Edward moved back to Goochland after he returned from Europe and worked the dairy at “Elmington”. Along with his brothers, he later worked at Briesmaster Bros. Motors/Briesmaster Chevrolet in Crozier. He married twice and lived to be 82. He passed away on June 9, 1971 and is buried in Greenwood Memorial Gardens in Goochland.

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Edward Robert Briesmaster’s uniform while on display at the History Center.

If you have any photographs of World War I service men and women from Goochland, please contact the Goochland County Historical Society. We would love to scan your photographs and add them to the World War I Commemorative Collection. Contact us at 804-556-3966 or at goochlandhistory@comcast.net.